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45 Superb Examples Of Old Science And Technology Magazine Covers

From time to time we need to remember our past in order to realize how far the technology has come. Besides this, it’s also very fun to see people’s reaction to innovation which today is something very common to us.

Byte

BYTE magazine was an influential microcomputer magazine in the late 1970s and throughout the 1980s, because of its wide-ranging editorial coverage.Whereas many magazines from the mid-1980s had been dedicated to the MS-DOS (PC) platform or the Mac, mostly from a business user’s perspective, Byte covered technical developments in the entire field of “small computers and software”, and sometimes included in-depth features on other computing fields as well, such as supercomputers and high-reliability computing. BYTE started in 1975, shortly after the first personal computers appeared as kits advertised in the back of electronics magazines. BYTE was published monthly, with an initial yearly subscription price of $10.

Compute

Compute! was an American computer magazine that was published from 1979 to 1994, though it can trace its origin to 1978 in Len Lindsay’s PET Gazette, one of the first magazines for the Commodore PET computer. In its 1980s heyday Compute! covered all major platforms, and several single-platform spinoffs of the magazine were launched. The most successful of these was Compute!’s Gazette, catering to Commodore computer users. The magazine’s original goal was to write about and publish programs for all of the computers that used some version of the MOS Technology 6502 CPU. It started out with the Commodore PET, Commodore VIC-20, the Atari 8-bit series, the Apple II plus, and some 6502-based computers one could build from kits, such as the Rockwell AIM 65, the KIM-1 by MOS Technology, and others from companies such as Ohio Scientific. Support for the kit computers and the Commodore PET were eventually dropped. The platforms that became mainstays at the magazine were the Commodore VIC-20, Commodore 64, Atari 8-bit series, TI-99/4A, and the Apple II series. Later on the 6502 platform focus was dropped and IBM PC, Atari ST series, and the Commodore Amiga series computers were added to its line-up.

Electrical Experimenter

The Electrical Experimenter was a technical science magazine that was published monthly. It was first published in May 1913, as the successor to Modern Electrics, a combination of a magazine and mail-order catalog that had been published by Hugo Gernsback starting in 1908.The Electrical Experimenter continued from May 1913 to July 1920 under that name, focusing on scientific articles about radio, and continued with a broader focus as Science and Invention until August 1931.

Popular Mechanics

Popular Mechanics is an American magazine first published January 11, 1902 by H. H. Windsor, and has been owned since 1958 by the Hearst Corporation. There are nine international editions, including a now-defunct Latin American version that had been published for decades and a newer South African edition. Popular Mechanics features regular sections on automotive, home, outdoors, science, and technology topics. A recurring column is “Jay Leno’s Garage” featuring observations by the famed late-night talk show host and vehicle enthusiast.

Popular Science

Popular Science is an American monthly magazine founded in 1872 carrying articles for the general reader on science and technology subjects. Popular Science has won over 58 awards, including the ASME awards for its journalistic excellence in both 2003 (for General Excellence) and 2004 (for Best Magazine Section). PopSci has been translated into over 30 languages and goes out to at least 45 countries.

Practical Electrics

 

 

Bogdan

Bogdan is the founder of Top Design Magazine. You can find him in Bucharest-Romania so next time you want to drink a beer there and talk about web and stuff, give him a message.

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