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Exceptionally Hyperrealistic Sculptures

Hyperrealism is a genre of painting and sculpture resembling a high-resolution photograph. Hyperrealism is considered an advancement of Photorealism by the methods used to create the resulting paintings or sculptures.

The term is primarily applied to an independent art movement and art style in the United States and Europe that has developed since the early 2000s.

The Hyperrealist style focuses much more of its emphasis on details and the subjects. Hyperreal paintings and sculptures are not strict interpretations of photographs, nor are they literal illustrations of a particular scene or subject. Instead, they utilize additional, often subtle, pictorial elements to create the illusion of a reality which in fact either does not exist or cannot be seen by the human eye. Furthermore, they may incorporate emotional, social, cultural and political thematic elements as an extension of the painted visual illusion; a distinct departure from the older and considerably more literal school of Photorealism.

Hyperrealist painters and sculptors make allowances for some mechanical means of transferring images to the canvas or mold, including preliminary drawings or grisaille underpaintings and molds.

Adam Beane

He started sculpting in 2002 and he worked with some of the best companies in the industry on many high-profile projects.

He sculptures exclusively in CX5, a tremendously versatile material he developed which handles like clay when warm but is hard as plastic when cool.

Jamie Salmon

Jamie Salmon is a British born, self taught contemporary sculptor, living and working in Vancouver, Canada. He started his career working as a commercial artist and sculptor for the movie effects industry. He specialises in hyper-realist sculpture, both figurative and portrait, utilising such materials as silicone rubber, resin, hair and fabric.

Evan Penny

Evan Penny makes sculptures of human forms out of silicone, pigment, hair and aluminum. His pieces range from the almost precisely life-like, to the blurred or stretched.

Penny says one of his interests “is to situate the sculptures perceptually between the way we might see each other in real time and space and the way we imagine our equivalent in a photographic representation.”Though his creations are lifelike, Penny believes that “the real can’t be represented or symbolized,”leaving everything to be a representation.

Ron Mueck

Ronald “Ron” Mueck (born in 1958) is an Australian hyperrealist sculptor working in the United Kingdom.

He began his career working on the Australian children’s television program Shirl’s Neighbourhood. He was the creative director and made, voiced and operated the puppets Greenfinger the Garden Gnome, Ol’ Possum, Stanley the snake and Claude the Crow amongst many others. The show was made for Channel 7 Melbourne between 1979 and 1984, broadcast nationally and starred the ex-lead singer of Skyhooks, Graeme “Shirley” Strachan.

Mueck’s early career was as a model maker and puppeteer for children’s television and films, notably the film Labyrinth for which he also contributed the voice of Ludo, and the Jim Henson series The Storyteller.

Duane Hanson

Duane Hanson (January 17, 1925 – January 6, 1996) was an American artist based in South Florida.

He was a great sculptor known for his lifecast realistic works of people, cast in various materials, including polyester resin, fibreglass, Bondo and bronze. His work is often associated with the Pop Art movement, as well as hyperrealism.

Alexandru

Alexandru is the co-owner of TopDesignMag. “If it looks easy, it's hard. If it looks hard, it's impossible. If it looks impossible, it's due tomorrow. At 8 A.M.”

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